Tag Archives: children

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back to schoolSummer festivities are still in full swing, but back to school time is right around the corner.

When you go shopping this time of year, you'll likely notice a change in the atmosphere. Instead of bathing suits and red, white, and blue picnic plates, there are lists, glue, and paper. The stores are stocking up on all of the new pencils, notebook paper, planners, and backpacks. The smell of new pens waiting to be opened, pencils ready to be sharpened, and the feeling of a perfect folder, all shimmery in the plastic – it’s intoxicating.

Childless adults might lament on the passing of time and remember childhood, but luckily, you don’t have to have children to take advantage of all of the back to school sales and specials. Even if you don't have children, here are some ways you can take advantage of back to school sales.

Office Supplies

Now is the time to stock up on the basic must haves for your home office! Just because you don’t have children of your own, doesn’t mean you don’t need a fun folder or binder to spice up your office. Also, by taking advantage of these sales you can purchase school supplies and donate them to a local shelter or school program that gives away backpacks full of supplies to those children in need who can’t afford to get their back-to-school basics. This will make your donation dollars stretch further.

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entrepreneurLike most teenagers, I had summer jobs and worked after school so I could have some spending money and save for college. I didn't really consider myself an entrepreneur, but I guess I was.

For the most part, they were jobs where I worked for a small business owner. Except for selling newspapers outside a subway station, I wasn’t an entrepreneur and didn’t work for myself. Even the newspaper gig required me to rely on a big company to provide the product I sold.

Being an entrepreneur and working for yourself — as I’ve done since being laid off as a newspaper editor in 2008 — is a job skill I’ve grown into and enjoy. I only wished I learned about it back when I was in school so that I could at least be a part-time entrepreneur during my working life. At the very least, it could serve as a backup or secondary income.

It’s a skill set that I think all children should at least have a taste of so they can decide if it’s something they’d like to do.

The first taste of entrepreneurship for most children is a lemonade stand. Even if their parents pay for the sugar, lemons, cups and other supplies, a lemonade stand can be an hourly lesson in how to set prices and make change, and show the importance of having a great location and product.

But after that, unless kids find the entrepreneurial bug on their own, they may lose the drive to work for themselves. Here are some ways to teach your kids to be entrepreneurs, or at least get started thinking about it:

Point out benefits of working for themselves

For children who don’t like being told what to do, this can be one of the first benefits worth pointing out to them about being an entrepreneur. By working on their own, they’ll be the boss and can determine what gets done when. No more taking orders from someone else.

Let them take things apart

If your child can build almost anything with Legos, or likes to take apart old phones, remotes or anything else you let them work on, it could be a sign that they could make a good entrepreneur.

It’s part of the process of learning new things — another skill important to being an entrepreneur. ...continue reading

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kids' summer vacationsSummer vacation is fast approaching, and as excited as most kids are to be out of school, some will be complaining of boredom soon after. In order to beat the boredom blues, and still stay under budget, here are 8 fun and free activities for kids' summer vacations, some are even classics with a few new twists to make them more interesting.

1 Build a Blanket Fort

This is a great activity if it’s rainy and the kids can’t get outside. To make it even better, have a contest to see who can build the best one. Set rules up ahead of time if you are concerned the competition could lead to bickering. If your children are younger, read to them by flashlight inside the tent instead. Your kids might even decided to have a living room camp out if you let them leave up the blanket fort overnight.

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