parenting“Do what I say and not what I do” is something too many kids can hear when growing up. And if not in those words, then in their parents’ actions.

Speeding, swearing, not exercising and poor money habits are bad examples that parents can set without realizing it.

Some parenting “fails” teach children about money — but in bad way. Here are some parenting “fails” that parents can turn around to teach their children about money:

Bad parenting impulse buys

Some impulse purchases can be fun. An ice cream treat after a tough week at school or a movie out as a way to break up the monotony of staying home too many nights can be  worthwhile motivators for kids to do better in school or at least be a fun break.

But if you can’t afford them, or spend too much on an expensive impulse buy — such as the latest technological gadget that you’ve coveted for months — then it can show a lack of restraint in how you shop.

Even small impulse buys, if made often, can show your child that it’s OK to buy something without giving it much thought and that you get what you want. But small purchases add up, and a better lesson would be to give up such purchases and put that money aside in a vacation fund for the whole family to enjoy the benefits of giving up short-term joys for long-term planning of a family vacation.

Every parent has probably had their child ask for a candy bar or something while waiting at the grocery checkout line. Telling them no can be difficult, but it beats raising a child who thinks they’re entitled to everything they see. ...continue reading

As someone who doesn't carry a wallet, I'm always thankful when I find a retailer that accepts credit card payments through my phone.

Such businesses are difficult to find, so my iPhone is inside a small case that opens to hold only three cards: my driver's license, a debit card and a credit card. No, it's not a man purse. It's the size of my phone, but about twice as thick. For me, it beats carrying around both a phone and a wallet.

But even with just one credit card on me, it's tempting to leave it at home and only carry my phone with me.

When I go to a business with a mobile card reader, I'm looking for one that uses Bluetooth technology to connect my mobile phone to its credit card reader so that the credit card stored on my phone can be seamlessly and securely used.

I'm looking for Bluetooth for two reasons: So I don't have to carry a physical credit card with me, and so I don't have to use the chip in the card and spend an inordinate amount of time at the cashier.

There's also a third reason, which I really did't think about much until I went to Europe last summer for vacation: High merchant fees for using a credit card.

The mobile card reader from SumUp seems to solve all of these problems. Here's how: ...continue reading

flipping housesIf you enjoy watching renovation shows or HGTV, you are most likely aware of the process of flipping houses.

If you aren't sure what this means, flipping a house is basically investing in a house, fixing it up as quickly as possible, and selling it to reap a profit. But, can you start flipping houses as a side hustle?

Research Flipping Houses

First things first, know what you are getting yourself into. Flipping houses can be a lot of work. While it can make a great side hustle, sometimes it's going to take working long hours on the weekends and after your full-time job.

You'll have to understand the ins and outs of real estate, understanding the costs and how things can add up, negotiation strategies, and more. Flipping houses isn't for the faint of heart, but knowing what you're getting yourself into can save headaches down the road.

Have Cash (or Know Someone Who Does)

If you're struggling to pay your bills or save money, flipping houses is not for you. In fact, I only recommend this side hustle if you can put some money upfront for a house and the repairs, or if you can find an investor willing to work with you.

If you choose the latter, make sure you have a contract in place and that everyone understands their roles and duties. Remember to talk profit percentages. Who gets what, and when? Whos job is it to sell the home? Asking questions like these will make sure everyone is on the same page.

If you choose to buy the homes yourself, understand that trying to finance a home for the purpose to flip requires jumping through a lot of hoops. It may be easier to pay for the home in cash and then getting a loan for the repairs (if needed). ...continue reading