Tag Archives: work

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unethicalEditor's note: This guest post was written by Jon Dulin of PennyThots.com.

We are not afraid to admit that there are thousands of ways to make money on the side that can help you with your budgeting and getting out of debt. But we are also not afraid to admit that a number of these money-making schemes are not on the up-and-up.

While there are some very legitimate ways to make money (delivering pizzas or newspapers, doing some freelance work online, starting a small business), there are some that are illegal (prostitution, selling drugs, robbing banks), and there are those which kind of toe the line between legit and not-so-much.

We all know that just because some scheme is legal doesn’t always mean it’s right. Working a business and making money can and should have an ethical and moral component to it. But there are times when the love of money overrules ethics, morality and common decency. Even if legally the person can get away with it.

This is why we always say if something seems too good to be true, you should always ask questions and do research before getting involved in something that might be a little loose with ethics if not the law.

Now, to be clear, while we advocate finding ways to make extra money to help get your financial house in order, we are not writing about unethical money-makers as an encouragement to you. This is more for educational and informational purposes that there are some unethical things out there, and you should be aware of these so you can decide for yourself if doing something similar will work for you or not. If you have ethics, then you will pass and not get involved in anything like these. However, are any of these things truly wrong, in your view? ...continue reading

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entrepreneurLike most teenagers, I had summer jobs and worked after school so I could have some spending money and save for college. I didn't really consider myself an entrepreneur, but I guess I was.

For the most part, they were jobs where I worked for a small business owner. Except for selling newspapers outside a subway station, I wasn’t an entrepreneur and didn’t work for myself. Even the newspaper gig required me to rely on a big company to provide the product I sold.

Being an entrepreneur and working for yourself — as I’ve done since being laid off as a newspaper editor in 2008 — is a job skill I’ve grown into and enjoy. I only wished I learned about it back when I was in school so that I could at least be a part-time entrepreneur during my working life. At the very least, it could serve as a backup or secondary income.

It’s a skill set that I think all children should at least have a taste of so they can decide if it’s something they’d like to do.

The first taste of entrepreneurship for most children is a lemonade stand. Even if their parents pay for the sugar, lemons, cups and other supplies, a lemonade stand can be an hourly lesson in how to set prices and make change, and show the importance of having a great location and product.

But after that, unless kids find the entrepreneurial bug on their own, they may lose the drive to work for themselves. Here are some ways to teach your kids to be entrepreneurs, or at least get started thinking about it:

Point out benefits of working for themselves

For children who don’t like being told what to do, this can be one of the first benefits worth pointing out to them about being an entrepreneur. By working on their own, they’ll be the boss and can determine what gets done when. No more taking orders from someone else.

Let them take things apart

If your child can build almost anything with Legos, or likes to take apart old phones, remotes or anything else you let them work on, it could be a sign that they could make a good entrepreneur.

It’s part of the process of learning new things — another skill important to being an entrepreneur. ...continue reading

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favorite appsAs a freelance writer and owner of  various websites, I'm busy with a lot of things on my to-do list each week. Some of my favorite apps help me get through the week, though having a to-do list app isn't one of them.

Here are my four favorite apps for running my business:

Unroll.me

I get dozens of emails every day, many from public relations firms pitching me story ideas. I also subscribe to too many emails from businesses, many of which I found it difficult to unsubscribe from.

Unroll.me takes care of this easily for the two email accounts I have. With one click on Unroll.me's website or app on my phone, I can choose to either unsubscribe from an email, "roll it up" into an email that Unroll.me sends me every day and read in a digest format, or keep getting the email.

For my business email I've so far unsubscribed to 397 emails, rolled up 44 in its "rollup," and kept 46.

The numbers are less impressive in my personal email account: 169 unsubscribed, 68 rolled up and 137 kept. ...continue reading