Life

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negotiate your salaryThis is the first of two posts by Ryan Bonaparte on how to negotiate your salary. 

Most pieces of advice about starting a career generally focus on the basics of putting together an awesome resume, utilizing your powerful network to get your foot in the door, and landing that critical interview to secure your dream position.

These steps are extremely important, both at the beginning and at any transition point during your career. Without them, you’re basically just throwing your resume into a void, never to get a call back.

What is often left out, however, is the incredible financial benefit of negotiating your first and subsequent salaries.

While it may not feel like it, especially when you receive your first job offer with seemingly little to offer to a prospective employer in return, you are in a position of power in the negotiation process to negotiate your salary. The employer has decided that above all other candidates, you are the best fit. Don’t forget that fact. ...continue reading

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budgeting

This guest post on budgeting is by Ryan Bonaparte, who last wrote for Add-Vodka in 2012 about common financial mistakes that young adults make. Ryan is a long-time writer and author, delving into topics including personal finance, technology, and career pursuits. He lives in the Boston area with his wife and fiercely independent cat.

Budgeting can be an amazing tool.

From the moment you begin to track where you’re spending your hard-earned money, budgeting can help you begin to understand what your habits are, where your priorities lie, and what goals you want to set in place. That’s a powerful place to be in life, as you can move past surviving paycheck to paycheck, and on to building a security net and further wealth.

I often talk to my friends about the power of moving my money away from the things I don’t care about (a bigger house) to the things I do care about (a nicer car). While you can’t have everything because of a budget, you can put budgeting into an action a plan to have anything with a bit of planning and hard work.

But efficiently earning and spending money is not the meaning of life. There are other factors to consider when deciding how to spend your money, and more importantly what to do with your life outside of budgeting. ...continue reading

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car insuranceChoosing a high deductible is a way to save money while fulfilling the legal requirement in many states to have car insurance.

Going from a $500 deductible to a $1,000 one will save 5-10 percent on the premium, or about $15 in monthly savings for the average consumer. Moving three or more cars to a $1,000 deductible could add up to a fair amount of car insurance savings.

The savings could be put away to pay the deductible. Saving about $100 over six months of insurance premium payments can allow some people to pay their bills.

A higher deductible won’t only lead to lower insurance premiums, but to fewer claims filed to keep them low.

There are some things to consider before making such a decision. Here are some of them:

Have $1,000 stashed away?

It would be wise to have the higher deductible amount in a liquidity fund such as a savings account to cover you if you have an accident and have to pay a deductible — which is a specified amount of money an insured person must pay before an insurance company will pay a claim.

Deductible amounts are typically in increments set by each state’s insurance department, often set at $100, $250, $500, and $1,000. The higher the deductible, the lower the insurance premium because the insured is taking on more of the risk. ...continue reading